• The Washington Post has an eye opening piece on military waste in Afghanistan. It mostly focuses on a brand new $34 million building in Afghanistan that, due to the military drawdown, has never been used and will likely never be used. The piece also mentions a $45 million repair facility which is now being used as a staging area for withdrawal, and an abandoned $80 million building intended to be a consulate.
  • Sadhbh Walshe says Texas and the other American states pushing through draconian anti abortion laws should learn from Ireland's experience; it will backfire:
  • Much as I hate to rain on anybody's parade, I feel compelled to point out that eliminating safe and legal abortions will neither eliminate the need for the procedure nor stop women from obtaining abortions that are not necessarily safe at all. What will happen is that more women will endure trauma and hardship as they try to cope with unwanted pregnancies or complications arising from pregnancies.

  • Researchers at Tufts University have found that a yellow worm known as a Planarian has the ability to regrow it's own head, along with a brain that quickly relearns previous skills.
  • After Edward Snowden's NSA revelations failed to produce a tangible increase in their polling numbers, Der Spiegel has pronounced the end of the German Pirate Party. Maybe they will oust their leader in favour of Kevin Rudd?
  • It turns out sliced bread is 85 years old, and Sunday was it's birthday. So what was the greatest thing 86 years ago?
  • Consumerist has a list of eight tips to hone your haggling. I am especially intrigued by the second: point out the long term financial benefits of the seller giving you a discount.
  • Emily Mellgard from the Council on Foreign Relations discusses the debate over legalising the trade of Rhino horn, and whether this will decrease poaching. This debate seems an awful lot like the legalisation of trade in drugs and sex.
  • Research conducted by Princeton's Tom Vogl suggests there was not always a negative correlation between a society's/couple's wealth and birth rates.
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