Jonathan Silver at The Great Debate notes several alarming examples of how nature is already adapting to changing climates:

Animals, plants and even insects are now adapting quickly to shifts in temperatures, often by migrating to cooler climates, modifying their diets and altering breeding cycles.

This is happening at blinding speed in large, complex ecosystems. Throughout most of the 20th century, for example, tree range shift occurred at about 0.4 miles a year. Since 1990, however, climate changes have caused species range to move by an average of 12 miles a year. A 2009 U.S. Forest Service study, tracking 40 major tree species in 30 Eastern states, concluded that tree ranges had moved, on average, more than 60 miles north in less than a century.

A month ago The Economist published a special report on tax havens. The Economist's Schumpeter blog has published a reader suggestion on how to stop the use of tax havens:

So what is a worldwide full-inclusion system? And how would it significantly dampen a company's enthusiasm for profit-shifting?

Under this approach, each company’s home country would impose its normal corporate-tax rate on the group’s worldwide income. Importantly, this would include income earned by foreign subsidiaries, and deferral would not be allowed. A foreign tax-credit mechanism would prevent the double taxation that would otherwise occur from the same income being taxed once in countries where operations occur or revenue is earned and then a second time by the home country.

As a result, 100% of the group’s earnings would be subject to at least the home-country tax rate. Complex structures and schemes to move profits into tax havens would no longer be effective since even these offshore earnings would be swept up and taxed currently as earned by the home country. The motivation for such profit-shifting vanishes.

FP Passport have an amazing post about a council in England banning apostrophes from signage:

Already, Britons like proofreader Mary de Vere Taylor of Ashburton are speaking out against the proposed prohibition:

“It's almost as though somebody with a giant eraser is literally trying to erase punctuation from our consciousness,” she told BBC News.

She said there was something “terribly British and terribly reassuring” about well-written and well-punctuated writing.